What Is Intentional Creativity?

Imagine yourself at a fancy restaurant. You arrive and noone greets you. You look around and decide to seat yourself. The waiter comes out and harshly barks, “Whaddya want?” You place your order and when the food arrives, it is thrown down in front of you. The plate is not enticing as it’s clear there’s been no care taken.

Now, imagine once again, you arrive at a fancy restaurant. This time, the hostess greets you with joy and delight. She takes you to a cozy table, lit with one blazing candle. Soon, a waiter arrives with a genial greeting, pouring water for you and your guest. He asks if you are celebrating anything today. When your food arrives, it comes plated with beauty. There is adornment of herbs sprinkled, sauce decorates the edges. The flavors in your mouth burst with excitement. Just when you think the evening is ending, a gorgeous dessert arrives for your celebration, the celebration of life. This restaurant gave you not just a meal, but an experience.

In a nutshell, these two examples show the difference between an experience without intention, and an experience with intention.

So, then, what is Intentional Creativity?

Intentional Creativity (IC) at its’ roots uses creative means to bring loving intention to our way of being in the world. Whether dancing, sculpting clay, writing or painting, this process helps one to slow down, witness others, pause to bless, look within to discover the voice of wild reverence (the Muse). IC leads one to mine their story through imagination and visioning and access the deep inner well of knowing. By listening to the still, small voice, one is able to bring to light old, negative stories and consciously shift them with paint, color, movement, breath. IC moves beyond the thinking mind to engage the wisdom of heart and gut, the gleanings of the whole body. Working with IC is a glorious, mysterious surprise.

Slowing down to create with IC mirrors steps in our life: facing our fears, acknowledging our past, honoring grief, nurturing ourselves, integrating the dark and light. Calling forth our Muse is one way to work with IC. She is the bridge to the interior and exterior worlds helping to align one’s life. One does not need to be an artist to engage IC, but simply be willing to take the risk to be with the process. Intentional Creativity moves one away from victimhood (“Everything always happens to me!”) to ownership. It helps one to claim, “Yes! I am here. I can take up space. I have a voice. I am the author of my story.” Intentional Creativity is a transformational movement toward healing and wholeness.